Willie Anderson

A Scottish immigrant to the United States who became the first golfer to win four U.S. Opens, with victories in 1901, 1903, 1904, and 1905. He is still the only man to win three consecutive titles, and only Bobby Jones, Ben Hogan, and Jack Nicklaus have equaled his total of four championships. In the 14 straight Opens that he played, Anderson won four, was second once, third once, fourth twice, fifth three times, 11th twice and 15th once. Anderson was an original member of the PGA Hall of Fame, and was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 1975.


Jim Barnes
1974

Jim Barnes turned professional in 1906 and became known as "Long Jim" for his height of 6 feet 3 inches. Barnes won four majors including the very first PGA Championship at Siwanoy in 1916 as well as the 1919 PGA, the U.S. Open in 1921, and the British Open in 1925. Barnes' two PGA titles were the first in the event; there was no tournament in 1917 or 1918 because of World War I. His winning margin in the 1921 U.S. Open was nine strokes, a record which was not broken until the year 2000. Barnes was one of the most prolific tournament winners of the first few seasons of the PGA Tour, which was also founded in 1916. He won 21 times on the tour in total. In 1940, Barnes was honored as one of the 12 golfers to be inducted in the PGA's inaugural Hall of Fame. In 1989, he was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame. Barnes also worked in the Met Section including a stint as the professional of the now defunct Rockwood Hall Club in Tarrytown.


Jock Hutchinson
1974

Jack "Jock" Hutchison moved to the United States from Scotland and became a U.S. citizen in 1920. He won two major championships, the 1920 PGA Championship and the 1921 Open Championship at St. Andrews. In his career, Hutchison played in seven PGA Championships and boasted an incredible 74% winning percentage in those match play years. In 1937, Hutchison won the inaugural PGA Seniors' Championship at Augusta National Golf Club by an impressive 8 strokes, and in 1947 he won that event for a second time at PGA National at Dunedin. In fact, only five players in the history of the golf world’s oldest senior major, have won more than Hutchison (Sam Snead won 6 times, Hale Irwin 4 times and three others three times). In fact, Hutchison was runner-up three other times losing in playoffs in 1940, ’46 and ’51). Hutchison was elected to the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2010.


Gene Sarazen
1974

Gene Sarazen was born in Harrison, New York and began caddying at age ten at local golf clubs, took up golf himself, and gradually developed his skills; he was essentially self-taught. Sarazen took a series of club professional jobs in the New York area from his mid-teens, and worked hard on his game. Among the clubs he enjoyed affiliation with in the Met area were Fresh Meadow and Brooklawn. Sarazen won his first major championships — the 1922 U.S. Open and PGA Championship — at age 20. The winner of 39 PGA Tournaments, Sarazen, known as The Squire, was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame as a charter member in 1974. He was the Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year in 1932, and won the PGA Tour's first Lifetime Achievement Award in 1996. He played on the first six U.S. Ryder Cup teams: 1927, 1929, 1931, 1933, 1935, and 1937. He won the Met Open in 1925 and the Met PGA Championship in 1927, 1928, and 1938. Sarazen invented the modern sand wedge in 1930. The Met PGA established the Squire Cup Matches in the ‘80’s in his honor.


Craig Wood
1974

Craig Wood was born in Lake Placid, New York. Despite his total of 21 PGA Tour wins, Wood spent most of his career being known as a runner-up. For a considerable time, he was the only player ever to lose all of golf’s major championships in extra holes. He overcame this in noteworthy fashion, winning the 1941 Masters Tournament and becoming its first wire-to-wire champion. He would total 25 Masters Championship appearances by the end of his career. He followed his Masters success by winning the 45th U.S. Open at The Colonial Club. This was the first time someone had successfully captured the first two major championships of the year. Wood was a member of three Ryder Cup teams (1931, 1933, 1935). He won the Met Open in 1940 and the Met PGA Championship in 1942. Craig Wood was the professional at Winged Foot from 1939 to 1945. He was elected to the PGA Hall of Fame in 1956 and the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2008.


Ben Hogan
1974

Ben Hogan is perhaps most notable for his profound influence on the golf swing theory and his legendary ball-striking ability, for which he continues to remain renowned. Hogan became a professional golfer more than six months shy of his eighteenth birthday. Despite finishing 13th on the money list in 1938, Hogan had to take an assistant pro’s job, and was hired that year by Century Country Club. He remained at Century and continued to refine his game until 1941. Between the years of 1938 through 1959, Hogan won 63 professional golf tournaments despite his career being interrupted in its prime by World War II and later on a near-fatal car accident. His nine career professional major championships tie him for fourth all-time. Hogan played on two U.S. Ryder Cup teams, 1947 and 1951, and captained the team three times, 1947, 1949, and 1967. Hogan won the Vardon Trophy for lowest scoring average three times: 1940, 1941, and 1948 and won the Hickok Belt as the top professional athlete of the year in the United States. He was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 1974. In 1976, Ben Hogan was voted the Bob Jones Award, the highest honor given by the United States Golf Association in recognition of distinguished sportsmanship in golf. A special room is dedicated to Hogan's career, comeback, and accomplishments at the United States Golf Association Museum and Arnold Palmer Center for Golf History.


Johnny Farrell
1975

Johnny Farrell was born in White Plains, New York and turned professional in 1922. In 1928, Farrell won the U.S. Open. He tied with amateur Bobby Jones after the regulation 72 holes, at the Olympia Fields Country Club near Chicago, and won a 36-hole playoff by one stroke. He was voted the 1927 and 1928 Best Golf Professional in the United States, after a winning streak of six consecutive tournaments, on his road to a total of 22 career PGA Tour wins in addition to winning the Westchester Open and Met Open. He played for the United States in the first three Ryder Cups: 1927, 1929, and 1931. Farrell was the head professional at the Quaker Ridge Golf Club from 1919-1930 and later became the head professional at nearby Baltusrol in New Jersey.


Doug Ford
1975

Doug Ford was born in West Haven, Connecticut. He turned professional in 1949 and won for the first time in 1952. His first major was the 1955 PGA Championship and that victory helped him become that season's PGA Player of the Year. In 1957, he holed out from a buried lie in a bunker on the final hole to come from behind and beat Sam Snead by three strokes at The Masters. Ford had 19 PGA Tour wins and played on four Ryder Cup teams: 1955, 1957, 1959, and 1961. He also won four Met PGA Championships, two Westchester Opens and a Met Open. He was inducted into the Connecticut Golf Hall of Fame in 1972 and he was inducted into the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame in 1992. Ford was also elected to the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2010. When he won the Met Open in 1956, Ford was at Putnam CC and after stints at Tam O’Shanter and Vernon Hills, wound up his career as the head professional at the Spook Rock Golf Course when it first opened in the late 60’s.


Willie MacFarlane
1975

William "Willie" MacFarlane was born in Scotland but came to America and eventually took a position as a club professional at Oak Ridge Golf Club in Tuckahoe, NY. In 1925 he won the U.S. Open at Worcester Country Club, needing a second eighteen-hole playoff to beat Bobby Jones by one stroke. MacFarlane won 21 times on what would have been considered the PGA Tour in those days. Among his most significant wins were triumphs in two Met Open Championships. He played in seven PGA Championships, going to the semifinals in his best finish and winning nearly 60% of the matches he played. MacFarlane beat two other greats of the game when he topped Johnny Farrell in a playoff at the 1930 Met Open at Fairview and beat Paul Runyan by a shot at the 1933 Met Open at Winged.


Alex Smith
1975

Alex Smith was a member of a famous Scottish golfing family. His brother Willie won the U.S. Open in 1899, and Alex won it in both 1906 and 1910. Like many British professionals of his era he spent much of his adult life working as a club professional in the United States. He won the 1906 U.S. Open at the Onwentsia Club in Illinois, and the 1910 U.S. Open at the Philadelphia Cricket Club when he won a three man playoff against American John McDermott and another of his own brothers, Macdonald Smith. Alex Smith played in eighteen U.S. Opens in total and accumulated eleven top ten finishes. He also played in 8 PGA Championships, winning over 50% of his matches in those events. Smith also won the Met Open four times, including the inaugural Met Open in 2005 when the Nassau Country Club professional beat Willie Anderson in a playoff at Fox Hills.


Joe Turnesa
1975

Joe Turnesa, another of the famous Turnesa family made his impact on the Metropolitan PGA in the very first Championship in 1926 when he won that title and is the first to have his name engraved in the J.J. Lannin Trophy. In that inaugural Met PGA, Turnesa tied for 7th in the 36-hole qualifying then ousted Joe Sylvester in the finals at Salisbury. He worked his way up from the caddy yard to become the professional at Fairview Country Club (in Westchester) as well as at Rockville on Long Island. He finished second to Walter Hagen in the 1927 PGA Championship at Cedar Crest CC in Dallas. He was a member of the first two U.S. Ryder Cup teams of 1927 and 1929. Joe Turnesa played in 7 PGA Championships, 17 Masters, and 14 US Opens, including his best finish in 1926 when he was runner-up to Bobby Jones at Scioto in the first year the USGA played 36 holes on the final day. Joe Turnesa added the 1930 Met PGA title to his ’26 crown.


Jim Turnesa
1975

Jim Turnesa was born in New York City. He was one of seven famous golfing brothers; Phil, Frank, Joe, Mike, Doug, Jim, and Willie. All but Willie turned professional and Jim was the only one to win a major, the 1952 PGA Championship, besting Chick Harbert 1 up at Big Spring CC in Louisville, Kentucky. He had previously lost to Sam Snead in the 1942 PGA Championship final. Jim Turnesa played in a total of 23 PGA Championships and 16 US Opens, his best showing being a 3rd place finish in 1948 at Riviera. He won one other PGA Tour event, the 1951 Reading Open. Turnesa played on the 1953 Ryder Cup team where he won his singles match in Wentworth, England against Peter Alliss. He also won the 1959 Met Open Championship, beating Shelley Mayfield by a stroke at Woodmere Club. Among his professional posts in the Met Section were stints at Briar Hall in Westchester and Mill River on Long Island.


Harry Cooper
1975

Jim Turnesa was born in New York City. He was one of seven famous golfing brothers; Phil, Frank, Joe, Mike, Doug, Jim, and Willie. All but Willie turned professional and Jim was the only one to win a major, the 1952 PGA Championship, besting Chick Harbert 1 up at Big Spring CC in Louisville, Kentucky. He had previously lost to Sam Snead in the 1942 PGA Championship final. Jim Turnesa played in a total of 23 PGA Championships and 16 US Opens, his best showing being a 3rd place finish in 1948 at Riviera. He won one other PGA Tour event, the 1951 Reading Open. Turnesa played on the 1953 Ryder Cup team where he won his singles match in Wentworth, England against Peter Alliss. He also won the 1959 Met Open Championship, beating Shelley Mayfield by a stroke at Woodmere Club. Among his professional posts in the Met Section were stints at Briar Hall in Westchester and Mill River on Long Island.


Wiffy Cox
1976

Like so many of the professionals of the era, Wilfred "Wiffy" Cox got his start as a caddie at Westchester County Courses, taking advantage of early morning and late evening playing opportunities. Cox’s PGA Tour record includes nine victories. He played in more than 20 Majors including 5 PGA Championships and 11 US Opens, with his best major finish a tie for third at the 1934 US Open and a 12th place finish in the 1937 Masters. He was a member of the 1931 Ryder Cup team that beat the Brits at Scioto in Ohio. Cox had a perfect 2 & 0 record, winning both at foursomes and singles in what was then a two-day event Cox was the head professional at Dyker Beach Golf Course from 1921 to 1935 before moving to the head professional’s job at Congressional Country Club.


Tom Creavy
1976

Tom Creavy was born in Tuckahoe, New York. The son of a carpenter and one of seven children, Creavy learned golf as a caddie and first worked as a professional at Bonie Briar in the Met Section. A fierce match play opponent, and somewhat a child prodigy, Creavy topped US Open champion Johnny Farrell in the quarterfinals of the Met PGA Championship at age 17 at Farrell’s home course, Quaker Ridge. He won the 1931 PGA Championship at Wannamoisett Country Club at age 20. He played in 11 major championships, including the inaugural Masters in 1934. Creavy was also the head professional at the Albany Country Club and Saratoga Spa. Creavy was also a respected teacher whose pupils later in his career included Tommy Aaron.


Bobby Cruickshank
1976

Bobby Cruickshank first rose to prominence in reaching the semi-finals of the 1922 and 1923 PGA Championship, losing both times to eventual champion Gene Sarazen. In 1923, Cruickshank also lost in a playoff at Inwood Country Club in the US Open to Bobby Jones, a win that helped catapult Jones to a legendary career. He was also the runner-up in the 1932 U.S. Open. Cruickshank won 17 PGA Tour events and finished 16 times in in the top-10 at major championships in his career. Cruickshank was runner-up in the qualifying at the very first Metropolitan PGA Championship and went on to lose in the semifinals while playing out of the Progress Club in Westchester. His greatest year was 1927, when he won the Los Angeles and Texas Opens and finished as the leading money winner for the year. He last won on tour in 1936.


Jimmy Demaret
1976

Jimmy Demaret won 31 PGA Tour events in a long career between 1935 and 1957 and was the first three-time winner of the Masters. In perhaps his best year, Demaret won the Masters, the Vardon Trophy and was leading money winner in 1947. During his outstanding career he played in 13 PGA Championships at Match Play winning 63% of his matches, never lost a Ryder Cup match and played in 17 US Opens with a runner-up finish in 1948 his highest finish. Demaret played on three Ryder Cup teams: 1947, 1949, and 1951 and totaled 24 Masters Championship appearances. Demaret was affiliated with The Concord Resort and represented them extremely well in regional events. He was elected to the World Golf Hall of Fame in 1983. In 2000, he was ranked as the 20th greatest golfer of all time by Golf Digest magazine.


Tony Manero
1976

Tony Manero was born in New York, New York. He was an eight time winner on the PGA Tour and played on the victorious 1937 PGA Ryder Cup Team captained by Walter Hagen and contested in Southport England. Manero posted a 1-1 record in those matches. Manero played in 10 PGA Championships, 14 Masters, and 20 U.S. Opens. Of course he is best known for his 1936 triumph at Baltusrol when playing along side the steadying influence of Gene Sarazen, he fired a final round 67 and posted what at that time was the best score ever (282) in either a US Open or British Open Championship. That score also snatched victory away from the luckless Harry Cooper who had posted a record breaking score of 284 and was regarded as the certain winner. The Manero name was a fixture in Westchester where Tony served as the professional at Fairview Country Club.


Bill Mehlhorn
1976

Bill Mehlhorn won 20 times on the PGA Tour, but did not win a major championship. Only a handful of golfers have won more often on the PGA Tour without claiming a major. His best finish was runner-up to Walter Hagen at the 1925 PGA Championship. In all, Mehlhorn played in 12 PGA Championships during his career. He also was a member of the very first, formal Ryder Cup team, captained by Walter Hagen that won the inaugural matches by a score of 9 1/2 to 2 1/2 at Worcester Country Club in Massachusetts. While serving as professional at Fenimore Golf Club, Mehlhorn won the 1929 Met Open contested at Lido Golf Club posting a 3 stroke margin over Wiffy Cox. Hailing from Texas, Mehlhorn often wore cowboy hats on the course and was nicknamed "Wild Bill".


Jimmy Thomson
1976

Jimmy Thomson was born in North Berwick, the son of pro golfer Wilfred Thomson. His cousin Jack White won the 1904 Open Championship. In 1921 his father Wilfred was appointed pro at The Country Club of Virginia. The following year Jimmy sailed to the U.S. with his mother and sister. Thomson finished second in the 1935 US Open and in the 1936 PGA Championship. In all, Thomson played in 17 US Opens and 14 PGA Championships. He was also known for his personal life as a celebrity having appeared in the movie “The Caddy” with Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin and was also featured in “Shoot Yourself Some Golf” with Ronald Reagan. He was married to silent film star Viola Dana from 1930 to 1945.


Herman Barron
1977

Herman Barron was born in Port Chester, New York. He was one of barely a dozen professional golfers who earned their living as touring professionals in the 1930s and 1940s. His first professional win came at the 1934 Philadelphia Open. He would go on to take the Met PGA Championship in 1937. On February 8, 1942, Barron became the first Jewish golfer to win an official PGA Tour event by winning the Western Open. During one three week stretch, he won the Philadelphia Inquirer Open, finished fourth in the U.S. Open, and won the All-American Championship at Tam O'Shanter in Chicago. He also won the 1954 Westchester Open and the 1963 Senior PGA Championship. Barron played on America's victorious 1947 Ryder Cup team. He then held the position of head professional at the Fenway Golf Club for 15 years. He is also enshrined in the Westchester Hall of Fame.


Al Brosch
1977

Even in a Section as rich in playing talent as the Metropolitan PGA, perhaps no professional was as dominant a player as Al Brosch. The bespectacled and gentleman professional who served at Bethpage, Cherry Valley and Sands Point (where he ultimately finished his career), Brosch holds the record for both victory totals of the Long Island Open and the Metropolitan PGA Championships. He won his first Long Island Open in 1939 at Wheatley Hills before starting an incredible run in 1946 when he won his second LI Open title, and the first of six consecutive wins in that event. Even after his win in 1951 at Plandome, he was far from finished adding three more victories in 1953, 1956 and finally in 1959 at Rockville. Brosch was also a 6-time winner of the Met PGA Championship, dating from his first win in 1938 and including titles in 1941, 1947, 1950, 1952 and his final triumph in 1959. His 59 in a tour event at Breckenridge Park in San Antonio is another feat that has stood the test of time. Brosch was honored in 1975 as the Met Section’s second Sam Snead Award recipient for his contributions to golf, the PGA and the Met Section.


Claude Harmon
1977

Claude Harmon was serving as the head professional at Winged Foot Golf Club when he became the last club professional to claim a major championship, winning the 1948 Masters Tournament. In 1959, he was also hired as the head professional at Thunderbird Country Club where he served for the remainder of his career while retaining his position at Winged Foot until his retirement in 1977. In 1959 Harmon turned in an incredible feat placing third in the U.S. Open, while serving as the host professional at Winged Foot. Harmon is a two time Met PGA Champion and a six time Westchester Open Champion. The Harmon Family was honored by the Golf Writers as the Family of the Year in 1969 while Harmon was named the Sam Snead Award recipient for the Met PGA in 1982 for his contributions to golf, the PGA and the Met Section. A former President of the Met PGA, Claude was inducted into the PGA Hall of Fame in 2009.


Jack Mallon
1978

Few professionals had the impact on the image of the Metropolitan PGA the way that Jack Mallon did. He was the ultimate “gentleman pro,” and an incredible ambassador for the game and the association. His tenure in the Metropolitan PGA included head professional stints at three top area clubs; He started at Garden City Country Club, then moved to Cold Spring and finished his career at Wheatley Hills where he was beloved. As a teacher, his reputation was second to none and he had top amateurs and beginners coming to him for lessons from miles around. He got involved in the leadership of the Section and in 1960 succeeded Claude Harmon as President. His two year tenure along with Harmon’s one year helped usher in a new era of governance after more than three decades of John Inglis’ administration. Mallon also went on to become a Vice-President of the PGA of America, serving three years in that role of national involvement. Jack was a two-time selection as Metropolitan PGA Professional of the Year and was the very first Sam Snead Award winner for his contributions to the game and the Section. Mallon was not a player with a national resume, but was still among the area elite, boasting two back-to-back Long Island PGA Championships in 1953 and 1954.


Mike Turnesa
1978

Mike Turnesa was another of the famed Turnesa family who’s life and career revolved around golf. Turnesa's first job in golf came in the pro shop at the Metropolis Country Club. He then became assistant professional at Inwood in the late 1920s before being named "playing professional" representing Fairview in 1931. Mike continued to play the tour circuit for more than 18 years, winning six times, before settling down at Knollwood Country Club. He won the 1933 and 1941 Westchester Opens, and the 1949 Metropolitan PGA at Ardsley. He is certainly best known for having finished second to Ben Hogan in both the 1948 PGA Championship and the 1942 Hale America Tournament, the war-time substitute for the U.S. Open. Mike also played in the inaugural Masters Tournament in 1934 along with his brother Joe. Mike Turnesa was the 1963 Met PGA Professional of the Year and the 1986 Sam Snead Award recipient. Turnesa's son, Michael is a professional at Rockville Links (where Joe Turnesa also served) while his grandson, Marc Turnesa, has won on the Nationwide Tour and the PGA Tour.


John Inglis
1979

John Inglis was slight of stature but had an incredible role in the development and evolution of the Metropolitan PGA Section. Inglis was a charter member of the PGA as well as the Golf Course Superintendents Association. He served as the head professional at Fairview Country Club for over 50 years and was the President of the Metropolitan PGA for over 30 years, from 1928 until 1959. While Inglis was noted more for his administrative skills and leadership than his playing, he mentored and helped shape the future of a number of great players in the Met Section including the seven Turnesa brothers, Johnny Farrell and Tony Manero.


Ted Kroll
1979

Ted Kroll was born in New Hartford, New York. He served in the United States Army during World War II and earned three Purple Hearts after being wounded four times. He began a 34 year PGA Tour career in 1949. He won nine times on the tour, including three wins in 1956, when he topped the money list. That same year he lost the final of the PGA Championship. Kroll played in a total of 16 PGA Championships, 8 at match play and 8 at stroke play, that included a 4th place finish in 1961. He also finished in the top 10 at the US Open in six out of seven years and competed in 14 US Open Championships in total. He also played in 3 Senior Opens (best finish T-8th in 1980) and 17 PGA Senior Championships (with six top 25 finishes). Kroll played on three Ryder Cup teams: 1953, 1955, and 1957, and though he only played in 4 matches, won three times. After his playing career, Kroll succeeded Ron Letellier as the head professional at Cold Spring Country Club.


Jack Patroni
1979

Jack Patroni was a fixture at Apawamis Club where he served as their head professional and became a mentor to a number of successful club professionals and playing professionals. Among the young assistants that were touched by Patroni’s wisdom and guidance were Miller Barber, Terry Wilcox, Jerry Coats and his eventual successor, Frank Cardi. Patroni qualified for a number of US Open and PGA Championships but some of his best performances came in his later years in the PGA Senior Championship. He played in 8 of the oldest senior majors, making 5 cuts, finishing in the top 25 three times and boasting a tie for 6th in his best finish in 1958. His record locally was also strong and included runner up finishes in the Met PGA, the Westchester PGA and Westchester Open. His greatest accomplishment, however, was his victory in the 1964 Met Open at Briar Hall when he won the Championship over Al Feminelli and Wes Ellis, at the age of 57, the oldest Met Open Champion ever.


Jack Burke
1979

Jack Burke, Jr. turned professional in 1940. After serving four years with the Marines during World War II, he resumed his career in golf as a teaching professional in New Jersey. That was followed by a position as an assistant at Winged Foot Golf Club, where he was mentored by Claude Harmon. Burke eventually went on to become the head professional at Metropolis Country Club. He won the Met Open in 1949 at Metropolis, beating Gene Sarazen. Burke notched two lopsided victories in the 1951 Ryder Cup matches and was subsequently selected for the 1953, 1955, 1957, and 1959 teams. Burke won 16 PGA Tour events in his career, including the 1956 Masters and PGA Championship. He won the Vardon Trophy in 1952, a season in which he won four straight Tour events and was selected PGA Tour Player of the Year four years later in 1956. Jack Burke became the fifth recipient of the PGA Tour Lifetime Achievement Award in 2003, and was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2000.


Mike Fetchick
1980

Mike Fetchick was born in Yonkers, New York. He turned pro in 1950 and joined the PGA Tour in 1952. He won the 1956 Western Open at The Presidio in San Francisco in an 18-hole playoff over Doug Ford, Jay Hebert and Don January. Then considered a major championship, the Western Open was eventually demoted in status but clearly, Fetchick’s victory was a triumph among the top names in golf. He also boasted a top 15 finish at the 1957 U.S. Open at Inverness Club. After his club professional career, Fetchick joined the Senior Tour and holds their Champions Tour record for the oldest winner (63 years of age when he won the Hilton Head Seniors International in 1985), and the longest time between his last PGA Tour victory and his first Champions Tour victory: 28 years, 9 months and 27 days. Even during his Senior playing career, Fetchick continued to call Dix Hills home and was often found at Glen Head Country Club where he had served as their head professional.


Dave Marr
1980

Dave Marr followed the footsteps of his golf professional father, turning professional at age 19. A short time later, Marr took a job as an assistant club pro to Claude Harmon at Winged Foot Golf Club. He began playing regularly on the PGA Tour in 1960, and in that year earned his first professional win. A year later, he won his second and third PGA Tour events. He also won the Met PGA Championship in 1962 while playing out of Rockaway Hunting Club. Marr joined the elite of the golfing world in 1965 when he captured the coveted PGA Championship at Laurel Valley Golf Club, was named to the Ryder Cup team and was selected PGA Player of the Year. Marr served as a golf analyst for ABC from 1972 until 1991. He also established a golf course architectural and design firm in 1981, designing many courses in the greater Houston area. Marr was elected to the National Collegiate Hall of Fame in 1977 and the Texas Golf Hall of Fame in 1978. He was selected for the Gold Tee Award presented by the Met Golf Writers in 1990 and posthumously was selected as the 2001 recipient of the Met PGA’s Sam Snead Award for contributions to golf, the PGA and the Met Section.


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